Category Archives for "Invisible Illness"

Enjoying Nature When You’re Housebound With Chronic Illness

Close up of herbs on a windowsill. Title reads: Enjoying nature while stuck indoors. Bring the beauty of nature to your room

Living with a chronic illness like ME/CFS often means that you are housebound and unable to enjoy the outdoor activities you once loved. You might be like me, love nature and going exploring, but your condition has left you stranded in your home. But even if you can't go out, you can still enjoy nature while housebound!

Although there is no magic cure to get you out and about, there are a few things I have done to help me enjoy nature while I remain indoors. There is a calm and peace that comes from being around trees and plants. Lets see how you might bring some of that nature indoors.

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How To Cope When You’re Low on Energy

Woman lying on bed, exhausted. Title reads, How to cope when you're low on energy. 10 tips for managing life with debilitating exhaustion.

Having Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, or any other chronic illness for that matter, can be extremely draining and leave you without much energy to do even the most basic things. How do you cope when you only have enough energy to do one or two things each day?

There are a number of things I started doing (or avoiding) once I realised that I was constantly reaching beyond my limits and actually causing my flare-ups, I will share them here. I hope you will find these tips useful and relevant.

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Are You an Unchargeable or a Spoonie?

A lady with bed head, looking exhausted. Tital reads, Are you a chargie or a spoonie? Both analogies for chronic exhaustion explained.

​People often wonder what we mean when they hear us talking about spoons or that we are a spoonie or unchargeable. These are words I never used before joining the world of the chronically ill and disabled. In this post I will try to explain the meaning behind these terms and which one I identify with most.

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Don’t Do Your Best, Do Less: How To Avoid The Boom And Bust Cycle

A woman carrying a bucket of cleaning products. Title reads: Don't do your best, do less. How to avoid the boom and bust cycle.

Anybody who has ME or CFS (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) will be very familiar with the boom and bust cycle. ME's main characteristic is Post-Exertional Neuroimmune Exhaustion (PENE) also commonly referred to as Post Exertional Malaise (PEM). Feeling really ill, weak and exhausted after any physical, emotional or mental exertion. 

This means brushing my teeth, getting excited about a visitor coming, answering the phone or writing this post is exhausting and will cause an increase in a variety of symptoms. The problem is that when I feel better on a particular day, I tend to want to do more because I feel able and would like to participate more in life, but this can be detrimental.

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